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[1THING] Blog: Archive for February, 2018

[ Highlights of Zinke’s low points in year one as In(f)erior Secretary ]

Michael Reinemer

Most Americans see right through Zinke’s fake-cowboy, fake-conservationist act.  Instead of protecting America’s land and waters, Zinke and Trump are selling out the nation’s public lands to polluters and the fossil fuel interests. 

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[ The energy reality behind Cape Town’s water crisis – and why the U.S. should care ]

Cape Town’s Day Zero has been making headlines worldwide, but nobody’s talking about the energy-water nexus or its role in the drought.

     
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[ EPA Exhibit at 2018 Philadelphia Flower Show Highlights Healthy Headwaters ]

This year’s Philadelphia Flower Show showcases the Wonders of Water and the USEPA’s exhibit is no exception. By demonstrating the connection between headwater streams and wetlands, and the vital role they play in the overall health of downstream waters, the exhibit highlights the connection between healthy watersheds and healthy drinking water sources – and shows how the integrity of our drinking water supply begins far away from the kitchen faucet.

“The beauty of the native plants displayed in the exhibit’s headwater stream and bog wetland areas highlight the need to protect and enhance these aquatic resources,” said EPA Regional Administrator Cosmo Servidio.  “Conserving and enhancing these aquatic ecosystems in our gardens promotes clean and healthy water, while serving as a sustainable landscaping practice in our own backyards.”

The exhibit illustrates how clean drinking water begins at the very tops of watersheds in small streams and wetlands which capture and transport water through our environment to larger downstream resources; ultimately being withdrawn for drinking water.  Two-thirds of our drinking water comes from these downstream surface waters (rivers and streams) like the Delaware River, which supplies drinking water to the city of Philadelphia.

EPA’s exhibit begins with a small headwater stream shaded with beautiful native trees such as magnolia, fringe tree, flowering dogwood, and the sweet fragrance of azaleas.  The exhibit also includes a bog that is teaming with wild and unique botanical beauty such as the carnivorous pitcher plant, exquisite swamp pinks, and magical fairy wands.

The native plants displayed in the exhibit will show how they grow in the wild and how to incorporate them in home gardens.  The environmental benefits of these native plants include providing buffers for aquatic resources that help naturally manage stormwater, which can directly improve or maintain healthy water quality. 

Exhibit volunteers will engage with the public on the connection between healthy aquatic resources and drinking water, as well as provide visitors with information on the benefits of using native plants, sustainable landscaping, and stormwater management practices to instill positive ways of protecting our water.

The objective of EPA’s exhibit is to foster the continued appreciation of the multi-faceted benefits of these aquatic resources to help ensure the Wonders of Water for generations to come.

EPA websites also include information on promoting healthy water through sustainable landscaping, and how to get started.  Photographs of sustainable landscaping practices used in residential settings are featured here:

https://www.epa.gov/green-infrastructure or https://www.epa.gov/soakuptherain.

EPA’s flower show team, along with all the other exhibitors, are setting up the exhibit at the Philadelphia Convention Center this week.  The Philadelphia Flower Show opens to the public, on March 3, and will run through March 11.

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[ EPA Removes C&D Recycling Site in Luzerne County, Pa. From Superfund List ]

Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency removed the C&D Recycling Site in Foster Township, Luzerne County, Pennsylvania from the Superfund National Priorities List.

The National Priorities List is a roster of the nation’s most contaminated sites that threaten human health or the environment. The sites on the list are eligible for cleanup under EPA’s Superfund program. EPA removes sites from the list once all the remedies are successfully implemented and no further cleanup is required to protect human health or the environment.

“Superfund cleanup and safe reuse of the site continues to be a priority at EPA as we work to create a safer and healthier environment for all communities affected,” said EPA Mid-Atlantic Regional Administrator Cosmo Servidio. “Removing this site from the list represents an important step toward achieving this goal.”

EPA did not receive any adverse comments during the 30-day public comment period on the proposal to delist.

EPA conducted oversight of the remediation work by Nassau Metals Corporation to clean up soil and sediment contamination, and has determined the site no longer poses a threat to human health or the environment.

The 110-acre site is located along Brickyard Road in Foster Township, about one mile south of Pond Creek. From 1963 until 1984, the site was used to reclaim metals, including copper and lead, from cable wires. Cable burning and processing of materials at the site caused contamination of the surrounding soil and sediment that posed a risk to human health and the environment.

The cleanup included the stabilization and off-site disposal of contaminated soil and sediment. Approximately 80,000 tons (4,000 truckloads) of stabilized soil and sediment were removed from the site during the remediation.

For more information about the site, visit: https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0300881

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[ Mile By Mile: Ten Years of Legacy Roads and Trails Success ]

Mar 1, 2018
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[ Starbucks Testing Paper Cup Fee ]

Delish is reporting that Starbucks is testing a paper cup fee at select locations in an effort to become more eco-friendly:

This month, 35 London outposts began charging a five pence fee (equivalent to about seven cents, as of press time) to anyone who ordered their drink in the chain’s standard cardboard takeaway cups. The trial will last three months, and stats from the period will be used to determine if the practice encourages people to bring their own travel mugs. Baristas will offer those drinking their coffee in the store a ceramic cup, cutting down on paper while lending a more independent cafe vibe to the coffee giant’s shops.

Read the full story from Delish here.

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[ Opposition letters to Tongass Rider ]

Feb 26, 2018

Opposition letters 

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[ A court victory implements methane waste prevention, but Zinke’s deregulation proposal looms ]

The agency had suspended the 2016 rule, meant to cut the waste of natural gas on public lands created by venting, flaring and accidental leaks, in January 2017 following the orders of Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke.

However, the battle over regulating methane is not over.

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[ District court reverses Interior’s suspension of BLM Methane Rule ]

Alex Thompson

Late last night a U.S. District Court in California reversed the Interior Department’s suspension of the Bureau of Land Management’s Methane Waste Prevention Rule, noting that the agency failed to justify its decision to postpone core provisions of the rule.

Keywords: 

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[ Game Commission Now Accepting Orders For Seedlings For Schools Program ]

aaThe Game Commission is now accepting orders under its Seedlings For Schools Program which provides free tree seedlings to classrooms so students can plant them as part of projects to improve wildlife habitat. Orders will be accepted through March 30.

In years past, “Seedlings for Your Class” was intended primarily for pre-K and elementary students, but this year it’s been extended to middle and high school students.
There is no charge to schools that participate in this program. The seedlings are provided by the Game Commission’s Howard Nursery and shipping costs are offset by the Wildlife for Everyone Endowment Foundation.

Seedlings for Your Class provides a classroom, grade level or entire school with enough seedlings so each student can take one home to plant.

Traditional favorites white spruce and silky dogwood are available again this year. Four other species also are being offered: grey-stemmed dogwood, American sweet crabapple, American highbush cranberry and our beloved state tree, eastern hemlock.

Seedlings come in bundles of 25, and depending on spring weather, will be shipped directly to schools by UPS from April 2 to 4 and April 9 to 11. The nursery does not ship on Thursdays or Fridays so seedlings should not arrive on weekends when no one is at school to receive them.

Once seedlings do arrive, it is important to moisten the roots immediately and plant them as soon as possible, said Brian Stone, manager of the Game Commission’s Howard Nursery.
Seedlings should be handed out to students with their roots in plastic bags with moist shredded newspaper, or with the seedlings planted in juice or milk cartons for transplanting at home, Stone said.

Individuals and groups wishing to donate to the program can send checks to the Wildlife for Everyone Endowment Fund, which maintains the account for donations. Be sure to indicate the donation is for the Game Commission’s “Seedlings for Schools” program. Donations can be mailed to the Wildlife for Everyone Endowment Foundation, 341 Science Park Road, State College, PA 16803.

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